THE STORYKEEPERS





Traditional Casket making
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10:17 - New Cham Fei Casket, Chemor - The first stop, to witness a chinese traditional casket making workshop. Housed in a very simple structure, it is a dying tradition as not many people can afford it because it is relatively much more expensive compared to the simple modern ones and there are no young people to carry on this tradition. The beauty of this method is that it uses very huge tree trunks in order to have large single pieces of wood to be combined into 1 casket. Basically, the outcome of the casket is similar to the ones that u get to watch in chinese drama of old genre. Yeah, Po Chi Lam and those sort. 
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Huge huh? Raw wood is dried outside under direct sunlight to attain the red-ish colour and to dry the wood. An experienced master can earn up to RM100 per day. This is tough job as most of the processes are hand-made and rely a lot on experience instead of specified drawings.
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Chemor Railway Station
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10:50 Chemor Railway Station - Located very close to the town, in fact, recent development made it somewhat "in" town the Chemor Railway Station, one of the cleanest and most humble of stations stood waiting to be DEMOLISHED!
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This picture failed to do enough justice to the ambiance of this place. This main entrance overlooks the direct vista to the main road in Chemor and the picturesque canopy of the trees give a magical welcome to whoever that passes through it. Personally, i think it has superb qualities and surroundings to be transformed into a cottage style cafe.- you know, the ones with checkered red-white table cloths and wooden furnitures.
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The view that faces the railway can now witness the construction at the opposite site, which leads to the adjacent land where the new railway station is located. Once completed, this building will be torned down. Anyone who wishes to start some riot or petition to preserve this place, please contact the Storykeepers so that we can muster a young group of people to support.
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Kuala Sepetang Charcoal Kilns

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Its history dates back to the 1930s, but charcoal burning is recorded before Perang Larut in 1861-74. It is the Japanese that brought in the technology of burning charcoals to the chinese and these businesses are passed down for generations. The rivers and tidal channels are used to bring the logs to the kilns housed in long, atap-roofed timber sheds. The atap roofs are slowly being converted to metal sheets as can be seen in the photos.
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The kilns are roughly 5m high and 6-7m in diameter. They are coated in earth, built in-situ and reconstructed again and again when the bricks wear off after several burnings. Once the kiln is filled, the entrace is partially sealed. Branches are burnt to generate heat. The logs are continuously baked and dried for about 20 to 22 days and then allowed to cool.
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